The Rain Watcher

Set against a background of beauty and natural disaster, The Rain Watcher, by Tatiana deRosnay, is the achingly heartbreaking story of a family’s secrets coming to light. Each family member has his or her own secrets. Yet most believe the others have led charmed, problem-free lives. The secrets begin to unfold as Paris is consumed by flood waters.

Linden Malegarde, half American, half French, is a famous photographer whose mother, Lauren, has set up a family gathering in Paris in honor of Linden’s father, Paul’s, 70thbirthday, and of Lauren and Paul’s 40thwedding anniversary. On arrival, Linden immediately recognizes that his father is not well, yet Lauren denies it, insisting everything is fine. 

 

The Rain Watcher is an account of a son confronting mistreatment by his mother, as well as having stumbled upon her secret; and confessing his own secret to his father, who may have known all along. It is an examination of coming to terms with who we really are, and being comfortable in our own skin. It is another revelation of how secrets and prejudices can destroy relationships.

 

As a public health educator, this grabbed my attention:  Lauren catches a cold, and develops pneumonia. When the pneumonia is diagnosed, the narrator states that it’s not that bad, but that it is contagious. Actually, the reverse is true. It is quite serious, and it is NOT contagious.

 

What Made this Book Reviewer Grumpy?

 

  • The book was a bit heavy on description for my taste, and I found myself skimming over some of it, but that is a matter of personal preference.
  • Most issues were resolved, but the ending was extremely abrupt, and left some questions unanswered.
  • There were a lot of misused words, but this is common when English is a second language for an author.
  • Several times two words were written as one word when they should have been hyphenated.
  • In several places, punctuation is missing.

2 Responses to The Rain Watcher

  1. Cynthia says:

    Thank you for the very honest review! I prefer when readers are completely honest, instead of just trying to sell a book.

    • admin says:

      Hi, Cynthia. Thanks so much for visiting, and for your comment. I try not to be truly “grumpy”, but I do give an honest review with the hope that constructive criticism will help the authors with reprints or future novels.

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